Program Profiles

Real-Time 3D Finger and Palm Print Scanner for Entry and Access Portal Security

 

Dr. Larry Hassebrook with the University of Kentucky has developed a structured light illumination system that acquires a 3-D surface scan of a human subject’s hand with significantly high resolution to record the 3-D shape of each finger’s fingerprint ridges along with the palm-print. The non-contact, 3-D fingerprint/palm print scanner is designed to accurately capture 10 rolled equivalent fingerprints plus 2 palm prints in less than 15 seconds with no operator manipulation of the subject’s hand.

Response of Curtain Wall Architectural Envelopes to Negative Phase Blast Effects

NIHS has executed the contract for the Response of Curtain Wall Architectural Envelopes to Negative Blast Effects project.  Dr. Braden Lusk with the University of Kentucky will be leading this effort.  Dr. Lusk is developing architectural envelopes for blast mitigation solutions in typical curtain wall configurations.

Securing Industrial Control Systems Used in the Water Sector

Dr. James Graham at the University of Louisville, will be assessing and developing technology, methods and educational support to mitigate vulnerabilities systems that control much of the nation’s critical infrastructure, specifically in the Water Sector. This project will feature a detailed review and analysis of the ongoing research in the area, with particular attention to water system industrial control systems (ICS).

Securing Industrial Control Systems Used in the Water Sector

Dr. James Graham at the University of Louisville, will be assessing and developing technology, methods and educational support to mitigate vulnerabilities systems that control much of the nation’s critical infrastructure, specifically in the Water Sector.  This project will feature a detailed review and analysis of the ongoing research in the area, with particular attention to water system industrial control systems (ICS).

Securing Transport of Bulk Liquid Food and Chemicals

Dr. Fred Payne with the University of Kentucky is developing and demonstrating an electronic lock system on a bulk liquid food tanker.  A Milk Transport Security System was developed and optimized to a pre-commercial state under another DHS project.

The Challenge

The task of assuring the security of our homeland involves protecting the citizens of the United States, the nation's critical infrastructure and key assets. This is necessary to sustain the nation's vitality against terrorism and other threats. This protection must originate at the community level. It requires discovering, developing and deploying new technology that will support first responders and key decision makers in local communities.

The Mission

NIHS' mission is to discover, develop and deploy solutions that protect and preserve the critical infrastructure of the nation's communities.

The Institute

NIHS aligns projects and research objectives with the needs and requirements of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The strategy is to manage a distributed research enterprise that effectively transitions research and development into solutions. NIHS works with DHS to determine technology needs at the community level. Then, teams are quickly assembled from multiple universities to develop solutions to the needs.

The Strategy

Through management of the Kentucky Critical Infrastructure Protections Program (KCI), the National Institute for Hometown Security (NIHS) provides an ongoing, integrated program dedicated to developing new technologies and devices. NIHS works through qualified academic institutions to accomplish the technological objectives.